National Travel and Tourism Week - May 6-12

National Travel and Tourism Week (NTTW) begins Sunday (5/6), and AOT is celebrating it several different ways—with media segments, community events and even a sweepstakes.

The theme of this year’s NTTW, “Travel Then and Now,” highlights the travel industry’s history of economic impact in every corner of America. Across Arizona, tourism positively impacts the State.

*Did you know...

  • Visitors to Arizona spend $58 million per day?
  • 184,200 jobs are supported by travel and tourism in Arizona?
  • Travel and tourism in Arizona generates $3.09 billion in federal, state and local tax revenue?
  • Travel is a $2.3 trillion industry in the U.S., with $990.3 billion in direct travel-related spending in the U.S. by domestic and international visitors in 2016?
  • These visitors support 15.3 million American jobs—roughly 8.6 million direct travel jobs, and 6.7 million indirect and induced jobs?
  • Travel-related spending generated $72 billion in federal, state and local tax revenues in 2016?

*From the Arizona Office of Tourism, Issue 121, May 1, 2018

Find out the most up-to-date information on visitor statistics: https://aotimpact.com/

“Tourism is a huge revenue generator for Arizona, and it positively impacts the economies of all 15 counties,” said Debbie Johnson, director of the Arizona Office of Tourism. “Visitors to the state cumulatively spend $58 million each day, and that money simultaneously reduces the tax burden and elevates the quality of life of every Arizona resident.”

In addition to its benefits for the local economy, travel can also have a positive effect on personal wellbeing for residents and visitors of Arizona. Numerous research studies have confirmed the positive health effects of travel and time off, from reducing the risk of heart disease to decreasing depression.

Using time off to travel with family is good for everyone, especially our children—kids who travel with their families are more likely to attend college and earn more as adults. 

“Many aspects of the U.S. travel experience may have changed over the years, but one thing hasn’t: it’s impact on the lives of American workers all over the country,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, the umbrella organization representing the U.S. travel industry. “Whether we’re talking about 1968 or 2018, travel jobs have been a gateway to the middle class for millions—and they’re completely non-exportable, no matter how much the global economy changes. This National Travel and Tourism Week, we’re saluting travel’s long history as an economic engine in our country, and calling on our nation’s leaders to prioritize travel-friendly legislation, for the sake of millions of American workers.”

20 FUN & FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT ARIZONA:

1. Arizona has 3,928 mountain peaks and summits—more mountains than any one of the other Mountain States (Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming).

2. All New England, plus the state of Pennsylvania would fit inside Arizona.

3. Arizona became the 48th state and last of the contiguous states on February 14, 1912.

4. Arizona’s disparate climate can yield both the highest temperature across the nation and the lowest temperature across the nation in the same day.

5. There are more wilderness areas in Arizona than in the entire Midwest. Arizona alone has 90 wilderness areas, while the Midwest has 50.

6. Arizona has 26 peaks that are more than 10,000 feet in elevation.

7. Arizona has the largest contiguous stand of ponderosa pines in the world stretching from near Flagstaff along the Mogollon Rim to the White Mountains region.

8. Yuma, Arizona is the country’s highest producer of winter vegetables, especially lettuce.

9. Arizona is the 6th largest state in the nation, covering 113,909 square miles.

10. Out of all the states in the U.S., Arizona has the largest percentage of its land designated as Indian lands.

11. The “Five C’s” of Arizona’s economy are: Cattle, Copper, Citrus, Cotton, and Climate.

12. More copper is mined in Arizona than all the other states combined, and the Morenci Mine is the largest copper producer in all of North America.

13. Clark Gable and Carole Lombard, two of the most prominent movie stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age, were married on March 18, 1939, in Kingman, Arizona.

14. Covering 18,608 sq. miles, Coconino County is the second largest county by land area in the 48 contiguous United States.

15. Bisbee, Arizona is known as the Queen of the Copper Mines because during its mining heyday it produced nearly 25 percent of the world's copper and was the largest city in the Southwest between Saint Louis and San Francisco.

16. Billy the Kid killed his first man, Windy Cahill, in Bonita, Arizona.

17. Pioneer filmmaker, Cecil B. DeMille originally traveled to Flagstaff to make his first film but he arrived there in the middle of a storm and decided to move operations further west, to Hollywood. His film, The Squaw Man (1914), went on to be wildly successful, launching the fledgling movie industry and establishing Hollywood as the movie capital of the world.

18. Arizona grows enough cotton each year to make more than one pair of jeans for every person in the United States.

19. Famous labor leader and activist Cesar Chavez was born in Yuma.

20. In 1912, President William Howard Taft was ready to make Arizona a state on February 12, but it was Lincoln's birthday. The next day, the 13th, was considered bad luck so they waited until the following day. That's how Arizona became known as the "Valentine State."

This list was compiled and researched by the Arizona Office of Tourism and the Arizona Centennial Commission staff with the assistance of Marshall Trimble, Arizona’s Official State Historian. March 2016

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02 May 2018


By Elaine Earle